Hifumi Okunuki travels to Iceland to show solidarity.

Tozen President, Hifumi Okunuki and Chief Financial Officer, Louis Carlet  travelled to Iceland in March to show solidarity with Efling trade union.


 

Interviewed by Iceland’s Channel 2 news, the article from Visir, the Icelandic newspaper says –

Hifumi Okunuki, president of the Japanese trade union, Tozen, traveled from Tokyo to show solidarity to those who are on strike in Iceland. She says immigrants in Japan are struggling with similar problems as in Iceland.

“There are an amazing and numerous number of strikes here in Iceland. We felt it was important to witness this, ”said Okunuki, whose words were interpreted from Japanese to English in an interview with Heim Pétursson.

Immigrants in Japan also face difficulties. They think the problems there are similar to those here.

“We flew nine thousand miles to show our strength of solidarity.”

http://www.visir.is/g/2019190308963?fbclid=IwAR33tXDPVYSnlV5v61dR3zNEd2iejXwy91UVcjZ2PHL9wVey8axL5kTyFnM

Flugu níu þúsund kílómetra til að sýna Eflingu samstöðu

Kolbeinn Tumi Daðason skrifar 8. mars 2019 11:32

Hifumi Okunuki, forseti japanska verkalýðsfélagsins Tozen, ferðaðist frá Tókýó til að sýna þeim sem fara í verkfall á Íslandi samstöðu. Hún segir innflytjendur í Japan glíma við sambærileg vandamál og á Íslandi.

„Þetta er magnað og fjölmennt verkfall hér á Íslandi. Okkur fannst mikilvægt að verða vitni að þessu,“ sagði Okunuki en túlkur þýddi orð hennar jafnóðum úr japönsku yfir á ensku í viðtali við Heimi Má Pétursson.

Innflytjendur í Japan glími einnig við erfiðleika. Þau telja vandamálin þar svipuð þeim hérna.

„Við flugum níu þúsund kílómetra til að sýna Eflingu samstöðu.“

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Tozen Chalks Op Another Win Against JCFL

Yet another win for Tozen, get ready for our next victory.

Tokyo District Court on Thursday ruled against JCFL (Bunsai Gakuen) and in favor of Tozen Union members teaching there.  The verdict upheld earlier decisions saying the JCFL illegally obstructed union leafleting in front of the school.
The court dismissed the school’s claims that the action endangered the safety of students arriving at the gate.  JCFL’s posting of staffers outside was a clear attempt to hurt the union’s image in the eyes of other workers/potential recruits, the ruling said.
JCFL has a fortnight to submit an appeal to Tokyo High Court.

英字新聞ジャパンタイムズ編集スタッフからの公開書簡

2018年11月30日、ジャパンタイムズ社取締役編集委員会は、第二次世界大戦時やそれ以前に日本企業で強制的に労働に従事させられた労働者やいわゆる「慰安婦」について、どのように表現するかを定めた「編集者の注釈」を発表しました。

従前の用語規定では、慰安婦について「第二次世界大戦時やそれ以前に日本軍に性行為を強制された女性」と表現していました。しかし、新たな規定においては、「意思に反した女性を含む、日本軍に性行為を提供するため戦時の売春宿で働いていた女性」と変更しました。

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Japan Times Editors’ Open Letter

On Nov. 30, 2018, the Executive Editorial Committee at The Japan Times published an Editor’s Note announcing changes in the way the newspaper would describe both the so-called comfort women and wartime forced laborers recruited before and during World War II to work for Japanese companies.

Under the former style, the comfort women were described as “women who were forced to provide sex for Japanese troops before and during World War II.” Under the new style, they were to be referred to as “women who worked in wartime brothels, including those who did so against their will, to provide sex to Japanese soldiers.”

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Tozen Union Leaders Meet with Education Ministry over Simul’s Law Flouting

Tozen Union leaders and members met with officials from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) on Nov. 26 to protest Simul International’s labor practices. The language school fired much of its long-serving staff just prior to them gaining the right to permanent employment after five years of service. The right is guaranteed under the amended Labor Contract Law.

 

Simul does frequent and lucrative business with MEXT, including interpreting for major international conferences. The union has already sued the company in the Tokyo Labor Commission for illegal refusal to negotiate in good faith.

 

President Hifumi Okunuki  accompanied Field Director Gerome Rothman, members Ian Duncan, Chris Harrington, and Robert Carnochan to present a request to the ministry to investigate Simul’s evasion of the so-called five-year rule

Union officials gave an overview of the case, and members then explained how the sudden firing has disrupted long-term plans and family lives. They asked the ministry to encourage Simul to reinstate the fired members immediately. The ministry expressed concern but stopped short of promising results.

 

 

 

 

Finally, the union asked MEXT to arrange a formal meeting to discuss the matter further.

Tozen Union Marks a Whole ‘nother Victory Against Heart!

 

Tozen Union Marks a Whole ‘nother Victory Against Heart!
Tozen Union Marks a Whole ‘nother Victory Against Heart!

 

Just weeks after the Tokyo Labor Commission ruled against Heart Corporation and its insistence on holding collective bargaining only in Ibaraki Prefecture – hours from Tokyo, Tozen Union scored another win last week as the ALT dispatcher finally agreed to meet in Tokyo.

Now, Tozen will be fighting for Ravy’s reinstatement. Heart fired Union Member Ravy in 2016 for seeking assistance from coworkers during a painful personal crisis. Tozen Union demanded CB, but Heart President Tatsumi Wakabayashi insisted the venue be in Mito, Ibaraki Prefecture, where the company is headquartered, even though Ravy had worked in Yokohama and Tozen is headquartered in the capital.

After several attempts to work out the venue issue and repeated refusals by the company, Tozen last year sued at the Tokyo Labor Commission. Wakabayashi was reportedly outraged that the labor commission in Tokyo, not Ibaraki, would adjudicate, since it meant that he had to come to Tokyo several times any way.

The meirei verdict orders Heart to “engage in collective bargaining in good faith toward an agreement over the dismissal and unpaid wages without insisting on Mito as the venue.” It also suggests Tokyo as the venue for collective bargaining session number 1.

Heart perhaps didn’t feel like fighting an appeal, which also would be in Tokyo. Wakabayashi has finally resigned himself to the fact that he has to negotiate and not set all the rules unilaterally.

Labor Commission to Heart: Don’t demand union come to you!

 

Tokyo Labor Commission on Friday handed down a win to Tozen Union against Heart Corporation, ruling that the ALT dispatcher had refused collective bargaining in violation of Article 7.2 of Japan’s Trade Union Act.

The corporation has a notorious history of treating ALTs with utter contempt. Heart is “one of the worst in a terrible industry,” as described by Tozen organizer Louis Carlet.

The inaptly named corporation fired Union Member Ravy in 2016 for seeking assistance from coworkers during a painful personal crisis. Tozen Union demanded CB, but Heart President Tatsumi Wakabayashi insisted the venue be in Mito, Ibaraki Prefecture, where the company is headquartered, even though Ravy had worked in Yokohama and Tozen is headquartered in the capital.

After several attempts to work out the venue issue and repeated refusals by the company, Tozen last year sued at the Tokyo Labor Commission. Wakabayashi was reportedly outraged that the labor commission in Tokyo, not Ibaraki, would adjudicate, since it meant that he had to come to Tokyo several times any way.

Heart may well appeal the ruling to the Central Labor Commission. Management might want to consider that carefully, however, since that commission is also located in Tokyo. Although Tozen here scored yet another victory, the dismissal has yet to be overturned.